My garden so far: May 2019

I say my garden, but really I mean my green spaces as there will be a bit about my allotment here, too.

Gardening and especially the allotment have had to take a backseat yet again this year as I am now 4 months pregnant! There has been much more nausea this time and I have also felt weaker, so really haven’t felt up to digging. Nonetheless, as I managed to plant a few things at home last summer and persuaded a few friends to dig over a bed for me earlier this year, there are a few things to share.

We have a pretty big front yard, but only a tiny patch of can be planted at the moment. I hope that eventually I’ll expand it, but that’s very much a long term project. When we moved in, there was a very ugly shrub in the area that was dug over. Last year I finally dug it out & replaced it – there are now two young peonies and a young hydrangea there alongside various perennials. This year the peonies and hydrangeas are still tiny (as to be expected), but other things have come out already. I’ll share more of the garden as it develops.

There is a bleeding heart that I bought reduced for £1.50 last year.

Two kinds of columbine, including one particularly beautiful white one with huge flowers.

A foxglove (actually, 3 spikes) that I bought for 50p at a florist that was closing.

Some dutch irises that are starting to bud and will hopefully open in the next month or so.

Meanwhile, it’s chaos at the allotment! I am so annoyed with myself for not digging in January like I’d planned before; I started feeling unwell at peak opportunity, unfortunately. But on Good Friday, I did invite some friends for a picnic and they very generously dug over a bed for me. I’ve managed to plant 3 rows of potatoes, two rows of peas, and a row of beets. I’ve been trying to pop down with Mabel every now and then to check on things and keep that bed clear. In an ideal world, I will also get another bed slightly prepared so I can scatter some wildflower seeds to encourage pollinators, if nothing else.



Poem for a Thursday: William Barnes

Today seemed to be unintentionally bird-themed. On my morning cycle to work I said hello to them as I went past, even singing Blackbirdsinging in the dead of night as I went. Then the morning radio program I listen to had a bird-themed feature. And then during our morning meeting I spotted Poems For Birds on the shelf, so how could I resist picking a poem from it?

William Barnes was an English Victorian poet from Dorset. As you can see, he wrote in dialect. This is challenging to read, but I love that it reflects his passion for language. The Blackbird sums up my experience of spring in England and I hope you will like it too. There’s also a Youtube recording of this poem if you’re interested in hearing the dialect. It is a very thick West Country accent, and though Dorset is further south than I am here in Gloucestershire, the accent around here is quite similar.

The Blackbird by William Barnes

O V all the birds upon the wing
Between the zunny showers o’ spring,—
Vor all the lark, a-swingèn high,
Mid zing below a cloudless sky,
An’ sparrows, clust’rèn roun’ the bough,
Mid chatter to the men at plough,—
The blackbird, whisslèn in among
The boughs, do zing the gayest zong.

Vor we do hear the blackbird zing
His sweetest ditties in the spring,
When nippèn win’s noo mwore do blow
Vrom northern skies, wi’ sleet or snow,
But dreve light doust along between
The leäne-zide hedges, thick an’ green;
An’ zoo the blackbird in among
The boughs do zing the gaÿest zong.

‘Tis blithe, wi’ newly-opened eyes,
To zee the mornèn’s ruddy skies;
Or, out a-haulèn frith or lops
Vrom new-pleshed hedge or new-velled copse,
To rest at noon in primrwose beds
Below the white-barked woak-trees’ heads;
But there’s noo time, the whole däy long,
Lik’ evenèn wi’ the blackbird’s zong.

Vor when my work is all a-done
Avore the zettèn o’ the zun,
Then blushèn Jeäne do walk along
The hedge to meet me in the drong,
An’ stay till all is dim an’ dark
Bezides the ashen tree’s white bark;
An’ all bezides the blackbird’s shrill
An’ runnèn evenèn-whissle’s still.

An’ there in bwoyhood I did rove
Wi’ pryèn eyes along the drove
To vind the nest the blackbird meäde
O’ grass-stalks in the high bough’s sheäde;
Or climb aloft, wi’ clingèn knees,
Vor crows’ aggs up in swaÿèn trees,
While frightened blackbirds down below
Did chatter o’ their little foe.
An’ zoo there’s noo pleäce lik’ the drong,
Where I do hear the blackbird’s zong.

Poem for a Friday

George Herbert was a 17th century poet who was part of the unofficial group of metaphysical poets. These poets, and Herbert in particular, wrote prolifically on religious themes as well as experimenting with meter and imagery. If you have read and enjoyed Gerard Manley Hopkins, you have poets like Herbert to thank. I do have a real soft spot for 17th century poetry!

I had a bit of trouble formatting this one, sorry. These lines all follow each other immediately, rather than having an empty line after each. I hope you enjoy it, and for more poetry, visit Holds Upon Happiness and Covered in Flour.

Good Friday by George Herbert

O my chief good,

How shall I measure out thy bloud?

How shall I count what thee befell,

And each grief tell?

Shall I thy woes

Number according to thy foes?

Or, since one starre show’d thy first breath,

Shall all thy death?

Or shall each leaf,

Which falls in Autumne, score a grief?

Or cannot leaves, but fruit, be signe

Of the true vine?

Then let each houre

Of my whole life one grief devoure;

That thy distresse through all may runne,

And be my sunne.

Or rather let

My severall sinnes their sorrows get;

That as each beast his cure doth know,

Each sinne may so.

Since bloud is fittest, Lord, to write

Thy sorrows in, and bloudie fight;

My heart hath store, write there, where in

One box doth lie both ink and sinne:

That when sinne spies so many foes,

Thy whips, thy nails, thy wounds, thy woes,

All come to lodge there, sinne may say,

No room for me, and flie away.

Sinne being gone, oh fill the place,

And keep possession with thy grace;

Lest sinne take courage and return,

And all the writings blot or burn.

A general update

Sorry I’ve been so quiet! I had hoped to blog a bit more during my social media break, but funnily enough it’s much harder to write a blog post with one thumb than it is to write an Instagram post. Annoying, posting comments also seems a bit more hit and miss on my phone – I keep posting comments that then don’t appear. 😦 Rest assured that I am enjoying reading your blogs as normal. And as a treat (ha!) here is a random update from me.

I have been doing lots of reading and very little knitting on the way to work recently. One of my Christmas presents was a 3-month subscription to Willoughby Book Club and having books posted through my letterbox just made them too irresistible. Combine that with being back in a public library 4 days a week, and my book habit was always going to be indulged. I’ve not been reading as much as you dedicated book bloggers do, but I have read a lot by my standards recently. I don’t have the wherewithal to post full reviews at the moment, but a few recent highlights include: The Dark is Rising, Provenance, and Dumplin. Do pop over to my Goodreads page if you’re interested in keeping up with my book choices.

Little Mabel is suddenly not so little! She has been moved up a group at nursery and is now starting to get upset when she doesn’t get her way, maybe because it just doesn’t happen that often yet. I definitely think it’s partly a case of seeing that kind of behavior more now that she’s in with the older toddlers, too. I am pleased she’s being stimulated more (though worrier that I am, I am now concerned I’m not doing enough with her at home) and she is coming home even happier. She is clearly on the verge of a growth spurt, too, as she is Eating. So. Much. Food. Seeing her grow up is so lovely, even if it is just exhuasting some days.

My birthday was this week. I made a cake and cookies to take into work, which was nice, and I got some really lovely cards. The day before my birthday Mabel took not one but two hour-plus naps in her crib, too! Unfortunately the rest of the day and week have been pretty rubbish as Mabel and I both came down with stonking colds. There have been some sleepless nights for the whole family, and birthday drinks were cancelled. Overall I am looking forward to next week, though, and may pretend my birthday is on another day. That’s allowed, right?

Now that Mabel is a little older, I am finally managing to have Mabel-free time. Woo-hoo! Obviously I love being with her, but it is nice to make time for myself again. One thing I did recently was attend Made By Hand Cheltenham with friends. I’ve blogged about this craft fair in previous years and hopefully will blog about this one as well. I attended a natural dyeing workshop, which was fascinating. I will definitely be putting my red cabbage juice to use after Thanksgiving this year! There was also some really beautiful work on display, though I only bought a few cards in the end (including the one in the photo; isn’t it beautiful?!). It was a relaxing and inspiring day – I really hope that eventually I will be able to get around to crafts again. I’ve got a couple of things on the go, but at the moment I have very little energy. I can’t wait until I can sleep properly again. Maybe in a few years…

So that’s my life in a nutshell. What are you up to these days?

A few favorite dance tunes

My personal life is great at the moment, but I have to say I have timed my Lenten social media break well. The world is pretty grim. I definitely don’t think I would be up for reading other people’s opinions on the world at the moment, even if they agreed with me.

In light of that, what better thing to do than get lost in upbeat music? I recently heard one of my favorite songs to dance to on the radio and it made me realize how much I miss going out and dancing. I also realized I don’t listen to much as much music anymore, and I miss it. So without further ado, here are some of my favorite songs to dance around the house to. These aren’t in any particular order, and I’m pretty sure I’ve forgotten to include lots as this is very much a top-of-my-brain post. I would love to hear yours and what you think I’ve forgotten in the comments, too!

Hotel Yorba, The White Stripes

Teenage Kicks, The Undertones

Call Me Maybe, Carly Rae Jepsen. (Yeah, I said it.)

Shake It Off, Taylor Swift

Jumpin Jumpin, Destiny’s Child

Heads Will Roll, Yeah Yeah Yeahs

Standing In The Way of Control, The Gossip

Johnny B. Goode, Chuck Berry

Intergalactic, Beastie Boys


Poem for a Thursday: Amy Lowell

A few weeks ago I started poem a poem each Thursday, inspired by Jennifer at Holds Upon Happiness. In spite of being late one week and forgetting entirely another week, I’m enjoying having the routine of something to do each week. It’s also helped me get some other post ideas circulating (though who knows when I’ll be able to focus enough to sit down and write something!).

I have been selecting poems either by raiding my bookshelf (it’s the perfect excuse to look through my small but lovely collection) or by looking at the Academy of American Poets website, or occasionally the Scottish Poetry Library website. Both have extensive, easily searchable collections.

Amy Lowell is a well-known early 20th century poet in America, though I did recently find out she’s less well known in the UK. It’s a shame as her work is beautiful. This one is called “Dawns”. I hope you’ll enjoy it.

I have come
from pride
all the way up to humility
This day-to-night.
The hill
was more terrible
than ever before.
This is the top;
there is the tall, slim tree.
It isn’t bent; it doesn’t lean;
It is only looking back.
At dawn,
under that tree,
still another me of mine
was buried.
Waiting for me to come again,
humorously solicitous
of what I bring next,
it looks down.

Belated Poem for a Thursday: Gillian K. Ferguson

Oops, it’s Friday! Having started a second, temporary, job a couple of weeks ago in addition to my normal one, life is a little bit up and down at the moment and we are still finding our feet with the new routine. Overall this is fine because I know we’ll adjust, but in the meantime I do often forget which day of the week it is.

Anyway, I thought I would still share a poem today. Better late than never, right? I found this one on the Scottish Poetry Library website. I used the browse option and browsed till I found a topic, then poem, that resonated. It’s an approach I would definitely recommend! This one by Gillian K. Ferguson is short and really very sweet. It makes me think of Mabel and her little friends, and I think it does poetry’s job of producing a very individual and yet very universal image exceptionally well.

Learning to Stand

On the earth a stretched second
you stood, balanced. Gravity

glued dolly shoes. You wore
the sky on your head, jauntily,

light blue paper hat plumed
with feather clouds, as air’s

transparent gloves cuddled
you upright. Padding paws

forgot themselves in hands.
You learn the trick of standing

as the world spins, hurtles,
turns you upside down

in darkness. Already
you’ll lean less on me.